Category Archives: News

In the News: What Really Happened At The School Where Every Graduate Got Into College – by Education Next

Last June, NPR reported a good news story about a high school in Washington, D.C. where every student had been accepted to college. However, further research conducted this fall by NPR and local affiliate WAMU revealed that many of those students should not have graduated from high school. Kate McGee writes: We reviewed hundreds of…

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The Education Exchange: Dispelling Myths about CTE – by Education Next

What kind of students choose career and technical education? In this episode, Paul E. Peterson talks with Albert Cheng, the author of a new paper that finds that the students who choose CTE may not be as engaged in their academic courses but have strong non-cognitive skills. Other studies find that CTE may boost attainment…

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The Education Exchange: School Choice, Test Scores, and Non-Cognitive Skills – by Education Next

Some recent studies of the impact of school choice have found only a limited impact on academic achievement but larger positive effects on long-term outcomes like attainment and earnings. What could account for this? In this episode of the podcast, Paul talks with Marty West about his new working paper on the impact of school…

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The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2017 – by Education Next

Every December, Education Next releases a list of the most popular articles we published over the course of the year based on readership. This year, the most popular article by far sought to provide evidence-based advice to parents who may be wondering if they should delay their child’s entry into kindergarten for a year, a…

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New Evidence on School Choice and Racially Segregated Schools – by Grover J. "Russ" Whitehurst

Executive summary The charter school sector is presently on the hot seat because many charter schools are highly segregated by race, and often more segregated than required by the demographics of their catchment areas. Such racial imbalance can happen when the student body of any particular school is based on a lottery among applicants to…

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Two Student Loan Studies Everyone Missed – by Jason D. Delisle

Novel research that focuses on student loans tends to receive considerable attention these days. Yet two recent studies with big implications for the federal student loan program have gone largely unnoticed. Perhaps that is just a coincidence. Or perhaps it is because these studies contradict popular narratives about student debt that imply the loan program…

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In the News: The Charter-School Crusader – by Education Next

Even if you’ve put yourself on an Eva Moskowitz diet like Richard Whitmire, you might want to check out Elizabeth Green’s piece in the Atlantic on Success Academy and the growth of charter school networks more generally. Green’s article is a thoughtful reflection on the trend, beginning with the positive. Of all the reforms that…

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In the News: The Only Way to Keep Your Resolutions – by Education Next

Just a few weeks ago Rick Hess wrote a piece complaining that advocates for social emotional learning seem to be suppporting a wide range of things, to the point where it is unclear what the phrase even means. A widely-shared New York Times piece about sticking with New Years resolutions suggests that some in the…

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Bridging the College Completion Gap with Comprehensive Systems of Support – by Stacy S. Kehoe

Differences in college completion by socioeconomic status have widened over time. For all students, succeeding in college involves managing difficult tasks and balancing competing demands. However, low-income and first-generation college-goers face unique challenges. They are more likely to enroll part-time—balancing substantial work hours with school—and to attend resource-strapped, less-selective institutions. These students can face ongoing…

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The Top 10 RHSU Columns of 2017 – by Frederick Hess

Well, 2017 is about to go in the books, and that’s okay by me. It’s been a bizarre, overheated year, and I’m more than ready to give 2018 a shot. Before we do, though, it’s worth taking one last look at the year just past—at the good, the bad, and the ugly of 2017. In…

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